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I gave a guest presentation at the Texas S.T.E.A.M. Summit in Houston, TX, January 13-14, 2017. This conference was hosted by The Village School, in collaboration with MIT. I presented “Into the Ovoid” Patterns in Motion on Saturday, January 14, 12:45 – 2:30 p.m in an Art room in the school

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My presentation slides (with Notes) are here.

Film Festival Successes!

“Into the Ovoid: An Ovella” was awarded official finalist status at the 2016 Canada Shorts Film Festival.

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The film was included in the Diamond in the Rough Cut Indie Film Screenings on September 10, 2016 in Bristol, PA.

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“Into the Ovoid: An Ovella,” official selection at Flying Frame Independent Film Festival in Simpson, Illinois, was screened on May 20, 2016, generated intense audience discussion, and and was awarded Honorable Mention by the festival directors!

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“Into the Ovoid: An Ovella” was accepted for screening in the Experimental category at ANIMFEST 2016 in Athens, Greece April 11-13, 2016.

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“Into the Ovoid: An Ovella” is posted on Vimeo for supporters and film festival programmers to view. If you are not a supporter and interested in the film, please contact me through the contact page!

Limited DVDs are now available for computer playback only. Kickstarter rewards have been fulfilled. Sometime in 2017, after trying our luck with film festival submissions, I hope “Into the Ovoid: An Ovella” can become publicly available.

For updates over the course of the project, check out:
Updates on Kickstarter

Into the Ovoid on Kickstarter was successfully funded. Thank you!

Ukrainian eggs come about through a batiking process (wax resist and dyes) on whole eggs. These batik eggs are called pysanky. A single batik egg is a pysanka. My pysanky have a wide range of patterns, colors, and themes. It takes some planning to cover one color after the next, light to dark, with wax; you can’t see what the egg will look like until you finally melt off the wax after applying the last color. I blow out the completed eggs, hang them on a string, and usually varnish them.

I have over 200 batik eggs in egg cartons. They’re fragile. When people see them, they turn them around in their hands. They tell me I should find a way to exhibit them. But how can I display them from all angles, hands free?

Film. I outlined a narrative for a short film: Into the Ovoid, an Ovella. The story explores some of my best eggs and includes a time-lapsed demonstration of the entire pysanky creation process.

Through film I show these eggs in a way that approximates turning the egg around in your hands to see the patterns unfold across the contours of the egg.

Abbott Imaging Creative Services assisted me in developing the detailed storyboard. Together we solved issues of interference from reflected light, and determined how best to show the eggs from all angles through sequences of stop action and animation. We completed a viewable 19-minute version for a showing at MIT in April 2015. Over the following 9 months, we edited further and put finishing touches on the film in preparation for posting it for online viewing or download, and submission to festivals.